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Toolbox for Opto-Mechanical Components

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Project data

TUB.198.1.pngTUB.198.2.pngTUB.198.3.pngTUB.198.4.pngTUB.198.5.png

Toolbox for Opto-Mechanical Components

Category: Business, industry

URL (first publication): https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0169832

Keywords: Construction elevator

License: CC BY 4.0

Project status: Active

Maturity of the project: prototype

Assembly instructions are published: No

Bill of materials is published: Yes

Contributing guide is published: No

Contains original mechanical hardware: No

License for mechanical hardware: CC BY 4.0






Bill of materials is editable: No






no

Design files are in original format: No

no no



Free redistribution is allowed licence: Yes



Open-o-meter: 2

Product category: Business & Industrial


Description

In this article we present the development of a set of opto-mechanical components (a kinematic mount, a translation stage and an integrating sphere) that can be easily built using a 3D printer based on Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) and parts that can be found in any hardware store. Here we provide a brief description of the 3D models used and some details on the fabrication process. Moreover, with the help of three simple experimental setups, we evaluate the performance of the opto-mechanical components developed by doing a quantitative comparison with its commercial counterparts. Our results indicate that the components fabricated are highly customizable, low-cost, require a short time to be fabricated and surprisingly, offer a performance that compares favorably with respect to low-end commercial alternatives.


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Property "Desc" (as page type) with input value "In this article we present the development of a set of opto-mechanical components (a kinematic mount, a translation stage and an integrating sphere) that can be easily built using a 3D printer based on Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) and parts that can be found in any hardware store. Here we provide a brief description of the 3D models used and some details on the fabrication process. Moreover, with the help of three simple experimental setups, we evaluate the performance of the opto-mechanical components developed by doing a quantitative comparison with its commercial counterparts. Our results indicate that the components fabricated are highly customizable, low-cost, require a short time to be fabricated and surprisingly, offer a performance that compares favorably with respect to low-end commercial alternatives." contains invalid characters or is incomplete and therefore can cause unexpected results during a query or annotation process.

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