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Libre Solar - MPPT1210HUS

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Libre Solar - MPPT1210HUS

Basic Data

Category: Computer, electronics,Power Supplies,Chargers,Power supplies,Renewable energies,Photovoltaics,Photovoltaic systems,Small photovoltaic systems

URL (first publication): https://libre.solar/devices/mppt-1210-hus/

Keywords: solarcharger; dcdc-converter; chargecontroller

License: CC BY-SA 4.0

Organization: Libre Solar

Project status: Active

Translation status: 4-Manual Translation

Technical documentation

Maturity of the project: production / kit


Contains PDF-drawings: Yes

Assembly instructions are published: Yes

Bill of materials is published: Yes

Contributing guide is published: No

Mechanical hardware

Contains original mechanical hardware: No


Electronic hardware

Contains original electronic hardware: Yes

Public CAD repository for electronic hardware: https://github.com/LibreSolar/mppt-1210-hus/tree/master/kicad

Electronic License: CC BY-SA 4.0






no

yes yes



Other

Contains original software: Yes


Assembly instructions are editable: Yes

Bill of materials is editable: Yes



Project management

Issue Management System: https://github.com/LibreSolar/mppt-1210-hus/issues

Versioning System:https://github.com/LibreSolar/mppt-1210-hus




[[File:|frameless|link=|300x300px|class=imgproject_gallery]]

Description

The following chapter describes the primary functions of the charge controller. With expert knowledge, the firmware can be adjusted to suit your own needs and implement new features, including different control algorithms, wireless communication interfaces, displays, etc.

MPPT This charge controller is a so-called maximum power point tracker (MPPT), which automatically adapts its input voltage to the connected solar panel to extracts as much power as possible.

The MPPT function can only be achieved using a DC/DC converter, which is the core part of the charge controller PCB. It can be recognized by the large inductor and the large electrolytic input and output filter capacitors.

Three-stage battery charging The advanced 3-stage battery charging increases life of lead-acid batteries. The setpoints for the different stages are fully configurable via the serial interface and can be adjusted to your system setup.

   Bulk stage
   The battery is charged with maximum possible current until the topping stage voltage limit is reached. This is the stage where the MPPT algorithm is active.
   Topping stage
   The batteries are charged for some time using the maximum charge voltage. After a current cutoff limit or a time limit is reached, the charger goes into trickle mode for lead-acid batteries or into standby mode for Li-ion batteries.
   This stage is also called absorption mode. In case of Li-ion batteries, this is the constant voltage (CV) charging phase.
   Trickle stage
   This stage is kept forever for a lead-acid battery and keeps the battery at full state of charge. If too much power is drawn from the battery, the charger automatically goes back to bulk charging stage.

3.3 Load output

In order to protect the battery from deep-discharge, consumers connected to the load ouput are automatically disconnected at low state of charge. As soon as the voltage rises again, the load port is switched back on. 3.4 USB output

The USB port provides power supply for mobile devices like phones. The maximum current per port is 1.5 A, with 2.0 A maximum for both ports. 3.5 Communication interface

This charge controller is equipped with a LS.one port, which incorportates an UART serial interface. It uses the ThingSet communication protocol and allows configuration, monitoring and control of the charge controller. 3.6 Temperature compensation

The battery voltage setpoints for the different charging stages have to be adjusted depending on the battery temperature. The temperature can either be estimated based on temperatures measured inside the charge controller or it can be directly measured at the battery using the external temperature sensor to maximize performance. The external temperature sensor is also connected via the LS.one port. 3.7 LED indicator

The bottom LED close to the USB port indicates if the load output and USB port are enabled. If the light goes off, it means the battery was low and the charge controller protected it from deep-discharging.

The three middle LEDs indicate the state of charge (SOC) of the connected battery. More LEDs means more energy is present in the battery.

The top LED can be freely configured by the firmware developer, e.g. to indicate data transmission.

Technical data

Features:
   - 12V battery voltage
   - 40V max. solar input (36 to 48-cell panels, ideally so-called 12V panels with 36 cells)
   - 10A max. charge current
   - 10A max. load output current
   - Low-power 32bit ARM MCU (STM32L072)
   - Expandable via Olimex Universal Extension Connector (UEXT) featuring I2C, Serial and SPI interface (e.g. used for display, WIFI communication, etc.)
   - USB charging
   - High-side load switching

Built-in protection:

   - Overvoltage
   - Undervoltage
   - Overcurrent
   - PV short circuit
   - PV reverse polarity
   - Battery reverse polarity (destructive, fuse is blown)


Technical documentation

Manual


+ General Reviews General Reviews


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Property "Desc" (as page type) with input value "The following chapter describes the primary functions of the charge controller. With expert knowledge, the firmware can be adjusted to suit your own needs and implement new features, including different control algorithms, wireless communication interfaces, displays, etc.

MPPT This charge controller is a so-called maximum power point tracker (MPPT), which automatically adapts its input voltage to the connected solar panel to extracts as much power as possible.

The MPPT function can only be achieved using a DC/DC converter, which is the core part of the charge controller PCB. It can be recognized by the large inductor and the large electrolytic input and output filter capacitors.

Three-stage battery charging The advanced 3-stage battery charging increases life of lead-acid batteries. The setpoints for the different stages are fully configurable via the serial interface and can be adjusted to your system setup.

   Bulk stage
   The battery is charged with maximum possible current until the topping stage voltage limit is reached. This is the stage where the MPPT algorithm is active.
   Topping stage
   The batteries are charged for some time using the maximum charge voltage. After a current cutoff limit or a time limit is reached, the charger goes into trickle mode for lead-acid batteries or into standby mode for Li-ion batteries.
   This stage is also called absorption mode. In case of Li-ion batteries, this is the constant voltage (CV) charging phase.
   Trickle stage
   This stage is kept forever for a lead-acid battery and keeps the battery at full state of charge. If too much power is drawn from the battery, the charger automatically goes back to bulk charging stage.

3.3 Load output

In order to protect the battery from deep-discharge, consumers connected to the load ouput are automatically disconnected at low state of charge. As soon as the voltage rises again, the load port is switched back on. 3.4 USB output

The USB port provides power supply for mobile devices like phones. The maximum current per port is 1.5 A, with 2.0 A maximum for both ports. 3.5 Communication interface

This charge controller is equipped with a LS.one port, which incorportates an UART serial interface. It uses the ThingSet communication protocol and allows configuration, monitoring and control of the charge controller. 3.6 Temperature compensation

The battery voltage setpoints for the different charging stages have to be adjusted depending on the battery temperature. The temperature can either be estimated based on temperatures measured inside the charge controller or it can be directly measured at the battery using the external temperature sensor to maximize performance. The external temperature sensor is also connected via the LS.one port. 3.7 LED indicator

The bottom LED close to the USB port indicates if the load output and USB port are enabled. If the light goes off, it means the battery was low and the charge controller protected it from deep-discharging.

The three middle LEDs indicate the state of charge (SOC) of the connected battery. More LEDs means more energy is present in the battery.

The top LED can be freely configured by the firmware developer, e.g. to indicate data transmission." contains invalid characters or is incomplete and therefore can cause unexpected results during a query or annotation process.

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